Aller au contenu
Girodo45

Correction devoir

Messages recommandés

Bonjour,

J'ai un devoir à rendre pour lundi. Je souhaiterais savoir si j'ai fait des fautes. Merci d'avance pour la personne qui voudra bien me relire.

Voici mon travail (travail qui consistait à résumer un article et à donner son avis sur la question).

1/ Nowadays, we face environmental problems that the experiences of past people can help us to understand. This article is a book review which was published in the Guardian, (a left- wing daily paper which currently identifies with social liberalism), in 2005, one year after the Indian Ocean tsunami hit the coasts of several countries of South and Southest Asia. The tsunami and its aftermath were responsible for immense destruction and loss on the rim of the Indian Ocean. In a book review the journalist is supposed to expose the strengths and weaknesses of an essay.

In the article, Jonathan Porrit points out that Jared Diamond' s book comes allong at just the right time. Indeed, whereas the journalist reminds that mankind is partly responsible for natural disasters, (he makes a link between the tsunami and the human impact on coastal environments) Jared Diamond provides an overview of ecological problems that can lead to a society's collapse. He tries to marshal the facts surrounding the disappearances of past civilizations (he is a biologist and an anthropologist, so he must be relevant) and he clearly shows the parallels we can establish between these cultural collapses and the state of global societies today. The journalist explains Jared Diamond first thought the book would only be about environmental damage. However he discovered other factors which could explain the collapses. The journalist praises Diamond's essay since he studies a wide range of cases which can help the reader to understand what triggers a societal collapse. These analyses lead Diamond to be very critical of our environmental behaviour: while human activities cause long-term environmental damages, it seems people can't stop themselves from satisfying their immediate disires. Such behaviour leads to a deadlock situation. This is the reason why the journalist introduces Diamond's book as a warning: many countries are already on the verge of collapse. Surviving is a deliberate choice.

 

2/ We could define Diamond's Collapse as a row of case studies: several societies of the past that suffered utter collapses because of environment related reasons. What it interesting is that there is a lesson to be learned by all of us. Indeed, according to Diamond these past collapse experiences could easily happen to modern- day societies. What happened could teach us how to deal with one of the biggest issues in the world today: the environmental issue. Many modern- day societies are already about to collapse. But is the siuation totally hopeless? Diamond does not think so. Such optimism is surprising according to the journalist who expected an apocalyptic conclusion. On the contrary, Diamond offers us a hope: if we could learn to live as if the world was a polder, we could survive. A polder is a Dutch lowland reclaimed from the sea which is held back by dykes and pumps. We can see the polder as a metaphor. The idea is that in a polder neither rich nor poor people can afford to insulate themselves from the consequences of their actions. If through anyone' s negligence the sea breaches the dykes they die together. And no one can afford to postpone until tomorrow what must be done today. Diamond tries to make us understand that the world is a polder, and if we don't recognize that, we will drown together. For now, we can notice Diamond's dream is far from reality. We have difficulty thinking the world as a polder, that' s why we can say Diamond's idea is very seductive but also a little bit naive. It is difficult to believe that the developed world, or rich people in the developing world will wilfully scale down their lives so that the world as a whole can avoid collapse. We can say that the tragedy of mankind is that its conception of development contradicts its dream of sustainability. We can notice two reasons for that contradiction: on the one hand, a temporal incoherence, what is good for today is not necessarily good for tomorrow; one the other hand, a spatial incoherence, what is good for ourselves is usually not good for others. It seems people are not ready to live in the same polder yet. For instance, Donald Trump has always made it clear that he does not believe global warming is human-related. In 2017, he announced the United States would pull out of the Paris climate accord. The thing is that as long as people deny the environment is a priority issue, they won't do anything to change the situation. The metaphor of the polder throws into relief the fact that mankind has new responsibilities. As the philosopher Hans Jonas puts it in The Imperative of responsibility, the characteristics of the modern technological civilisation have changed the nature of our moral obligations. The concept of responsibility has been given a new dimension. People are not only responsible for themselves, they are also responsible for the future generations (for people who are not yet alive).

 

 

 

 

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Bonjour,

1/ Nowadays, we face environmental problems that the experiences of past people can help us to understand. This article is a book review which was published in the Guardian, (a left- wing daily paper which currently identifies with social liberalism), in 2005, one year after the Indian Ocean tsunami that/which hit the coasts of several countries of South and Southeast Asia. The tsunami and its aftermath were responsible for immense destruction and loss on the rim of the Indian Ocean. In a book review the journalist is supposed to expose the strengths and weaknesses of an essay.

In the article, Jonathan Porrit points out that Jared Diamond' s book comes along at just the right time. Indeed, whereas the journalist reminds that mankind is partly responsible for natural disasters, (he makes a link between the tsunami and the human impact on coastal environments) Jared Diamond provides an overview of ecological problems that can lead to a society's collapse. He tries to marshal the facts surrounding the disappearances of past civilizations (he is a biologist and an anthropologist, so he must be relevant) and he clearly shows the parallels we can establish between these cultural collapses and the state of global societies today. The journalist explains Jared Diamond first thought the book would only be about environmental damage. However he discovered other factors which could explain the collapses. The journalist praises Diamond's essay since he studies a wide range of cases which can help the reader to understand what triggers a societal collapse. These analyses lead Diamond to be very critical of our environmental behaviour: while human activities cause long-term environmental damages, it seems people can't stop themselves from satisfying their immediate disires. Such behaviour leads to a deadlock situation. This is the reason why the journalist introduces Diamond's book as a warning: many countries are already on the verge of collapse. Surviving is a deliberate choice.

2/ We could define Diamond's Collapse as a row of case studies: several societies of the past that suffered utter collapses because of environment related reasons. What is interesting is that there is a lesson to be learned by all of us. Indeed, according to Diamond these past collapse experiences could easily happen to modern-day societies. What happened could teach us how to deal with one of the biggest issues in the world today: the environmental issue. Many modern-day societies are already about to collapse. But is the siuation totally hopeless? Diamond does not think so. Such optimism is surprising according to the journalist who expected an apocalyptic conclusion. On the contrary, Diamond offers us a hope: if we could learn to live as if the world was a polder, we could survive. A polder is a Dutch lowland reclaimed from the sea which is held back by dykes and pumps. We can see the polder as a metaphor. The idea is that in a polder neither rich nor poor people can afford to insulate cut themselves off from the consequences of their actions. If through anyone' s negligence the sea breaches the dykes they die together. And no one can afford to postpone until tomorrow what must be done today. Diamond tries to make us understand that the world is a polder, and if we don't recognize that, we will drown together. For now, we can notice Diamond's dream is far from reality. We have difficulty thinking the world as a polder, that' s why we can say Diamond's idea is very seductive but also a little bit naive. It is difficult to believe that the developed world, or rich people in the developing world will wilfully scale down their lives so that the world as a whole can avoid collapse. We can say that the tragedy of mankind is that its conception of development contradicts its dream of sustainability. We can notice two reasons for that contradiction: on the one hand, a temporal incoherence, what is good for today is not necessarily good for tomorrow; one the other hand, a spatial incoherence, what is good for ourselves is usually not good for others. It seems people are not ready to live in the same polder yet. For instance, Donald Trump has always made it clear that he does not believe global warming is human-related. In 2017, he announced the United States would pull out of the Paris climate accord/agreement. The thing is that as long as people deny the environment is a priority issue, they won't do anything to change the situation. The metaphor of the polder throws into relief the fact that mankind has new responsibilities. As the philosopher Hans Jonas puts it in The Imperative of responsibility, the characteristics of the modern technological civilisation have changed the nature of our moral obligations. The concept of responsibility has been given a new dimension. People are not only responsible for themselves, they are also responsible for the future generations (for people who are not yet alive/haven't been born yet).

Congratulations on your excellent English! :)

Partager ce message


Lien à poster
Partager sur d’autres sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Invité
Répondre à ce sujet…

×   Collé en tant que texte enrichi.   Coller en tant que texte brut à la place

  Seulement 75 émoticônes maximum sont autorisées.

×   Votre lien a été automatiquement intégré.   Afficher plutôt comme un lien

×   Votre contenu précédent a été rétabli.   Vider l’éditeur

×   Vous ne pouvez pas directement coller des images. Envoyez-les depuis votre ordinateur ou insérez-les depuis une URL.

Chargement

×
×
  • Créer...
Par Création site web